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Trzęsacz is famous for the ruins of a church built at the turn of the 14th and 15th centuries, situated in the middle of the village, about 2 kilometers away from the Baltic Sea shore. For centuries, the church was approaching the cliff "eaten away" by the sea. In 1874, it became clear that the church could not be saved, and the furnishings were moved to the cathedral in Kamień. In 1901, part of the church collapsed onto the beach."Abrazja - erosion process occurs on steep, rocky shores. It involves the undermining and weakening of high edges called cliffs by sea waves, tides, and ebbs. As a result, the cliff becomes fragmented and rounded."The above is a purely scientific definition of the causes of the landslides in Trzęsacz. Much more interesting and colorful legends describe the reasons for the erosion of one of the most beautiful seaside cliffs in Pomerania. One of them is associated with the great love of two young people, here it is:"In Trzęsacz, there lived a fisherman named Kaźko, who loved Ewka, a girl from the neighborhood. The boy died in battles with the Brandenburgians, and his beloved died of grief and was buried by the church. Since then, Kaźko, hidden in the waves of the turbulent sea, tries to reach her. The lovers are to be reunited for eternity when the cliff with the last part of the church collapses into the waters of the Baltic."It is unknown whether the legend will ever come true. You can still admire the western wall of the Gothic church, and the cliff and shore are constantly fortified by the Maritime Office in Szczecin to prevent further abrasion by storm waves – such are the twists of fate :). A beautiful viewing platform leads to the beach in this place.The second legend associated with the Church in Trzęsacz is related to the obstinacy of people and tells the story of the daughter of the sea king:"Centuries ago, fishermen caught the daughter of the sea king. The unfortunate girl died in captivity and was buried in the church cemetery. The desperate father decided to reclaim his child and year after year, he took another piece of land from the village until he reached the church and took his daughter's grave to the depths of the Baltic."We recommend visiting this one of the most beautiful and romantic scenic spots in Poland.
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Turistic-Recreational Complex "Kaszubskie Oko" is a facility established in 2006, offering a variety of attractions for tourists visiting the municipality of Gniewino. The architecture of the complex was designed in the shape of an eye, with its most important element being the "iris" in the form of a 44-meter-high Observation Tower. To see the upper reservoir of the Żarnowiec Hydroelectric Power Plant, Żarnowieckie Lake, an 18-windmill farm, or ships sailing on the Baltic Sea, all you need to do is climb 212 steps or take the elevator. The observation point is located at an altitude of approximately 150 meters above sea level. The tower itself has the shape of an hourglass with a central core, around which spiral stairs ascend. The base of the tower is a green mound with railings, inside of which are office spaces.The recreational outdoor elements of "Kaszubskie Oko" include, above all, an 18-hole mini-golf course, a standard playground, and a "pirate ship" playground, walking areas, a barbecue area, and a chess field. The whole complex is complemented by a garden surrounding the tower with two water features in which fountains are placed. For both adults and children, the "Kaszubskie Oko" Restaurant and a small snack bar will surely catch your attention.
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In the 17th century, a Swedish ship wrecked near Rozewie. The entire crew, including the captain, perished, except for the captain's daughter, who was saved by a local fisherman. Grief-stricken, she settled in Rozewie and decided to light a bonfire on the hill every night to prevent similar tragedies. Some say the local population helped her in this endeavor. The captain's daughter continued to light the bonfires every night until her death. It is believed that the ship struck a rock known by fishermen as the "devil's rock" or "demon stone," under which, according to local tales, the devil resides and drowns anything that comes within its reach.The lighthouse in Rozewie was built in 1822 on the site of an earlier wooden structure, which supposedly existed since the 17th century. Due to the surrounding forest, it was raised twice: in 1910 and 1978, eventually reaching a height of 32.7 meters. Before the war, the lighthouse was visited by Stefan Żeromski, which is why it bears his name.In 1961, a small exhibition dedicated to the writer was set up in the lighthouse, later expanded to include the exhibition "History of Maritime Lighthouses." From May to September, the museum exhibitions are open to tourists from 10 am to 2 pm and from 3 pm to 6 pm. In other months, visits are possible only by prior arrangement.The octagonal lighthouse, built in 1875, served as an auxiliary structure. In 1910, after the older lighthouse was raised, it was decommissioned. Next to it stands an obelisk commemorating the reclamation of the coastline by Poland and a bust of Żeromski.
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Maintained in the English style, full of exotic trees, alleys, canals, and resting places. The spacious, well-kept park surrounding the residence is older than it. It was created based on manorial and bourgeois gardens, so it features an impressive old-growth forest that is 300-400 years old. Due to its age, an extensive network of ponds, and diverse plant life, the Wejherowo park is compared to the one in Gdańsk Oliwa.
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One of the attractions of Wejherowo is the Przebendowski and Keyserling Palaces, which were given their final shape in the mid-19th century. Currently, it represents a neo-Gothic style with distinct Renaissance elements. The building's structure, unusual for Pomeranian palaces, in terms of shape and appearance, is reminiscent of villas in southern Italy.The palace now houses a museum that collects and promotes Kashubian and Pomeranian literary and musical heritage, as well as other cultural treasures associated with them. The museum has gathered over 100,000 exhibits, including historically valuable source materials that allow us to learn about the history of Wejherowo, including documents with the Wejher family's autographs. Exhibitions, literary competitions, conferences, meetings with creators and regional activists, concerts, and book promotions take place here.The palace is a one-story building with an attic floor, high basements, three-winged, with an open courtyard facing north. The main wing is distinguished by central facades covered with stepped attics, similar-shaped gables, and attics crowning the side wings. On the garden side elevation, there is also a terrace and a small balcony on the short axis. The palace interiors have preserved the enfilade layout and original woodwork. The main halls are adorned with stucco ceilings and 19th-century wall paintings in the Pompeian style depicting Mediterranean landscapes. Original fireplaces have also been preserved in several rooms.
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Collection considered one of the largest in Europe. It comprises 6,500 species and over 2 million specimens. It's hard to believe that it all began 40 years ago with a cactus in a pot on the windowsill. The acquaintance with another cactus enthusiast resulted in importing the first seeds from Hamburg. Over time, these prickly plants displaced our native vegetables and flowers. In 1982, cacti and succulents already occupied the entire area of the 1,266 m2 greenhouse and ground cultivation. Among them, the Texan varieties stand out, reaching over 7 meters in height, as well as "mother-in-law's chairs" - round cacti with a diameter of one meter, and very rarely flowering in the collection, Haageocerus versicolor and Cereus peruvianus with their blooming underlay.The collection in Rumia has been repeatedly awarded at various national and international exhibitions. Its headquarters is here, at the Gdańsk Branch of the Polish Cactus Lovers Society. An attractive place on the coast, frequently visited by numerous tours. As a souvenir from the seaside, you can purchase a prickly plant here.
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Stone Mountain, rising to 52 meters above sea level is a great vantage point and viewing. From this point on should start with every trip to end up here too. On the day the horizon is very broad, and in the evening thousands of lights of the city and the port have a lasting impression. Is an impressive sight indeed. On the right as the eye could see the sea. On clear days you can see from the Hel peninsula lighthouse and cottage settlements away from this place about 20 kilometers. In front of it is north to Kepa Oksywska rises and before it in the valley of the port in all its glory. To the left stretches into the distance wide valley - by rating some probably Pradolina Vistula, and the range of hills extending far to the north and south. In the back behind us - stone mountain, and further south Kepa Redłowska.The whole harbor and the greater part of Gdynia positioned himself in the valley between the sea and the hills. Some areas in the city climbed the hills. Drawing on history, on the basis of numerous excavations - plugs and box graves - were settlements in the area ranging from 2 to 3000 years ago. This way, the trail passes as indicated by the amber amber found in the tombs, shell dishes, ornaments and coins.
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One of the newest museums in Tri-City, founded in 1999, is located in a modern building of the Institute of Oceanography at the University of Gdansk. It is equipped with professional facilities for the processing of amber and has the second largest collection of inclusions in Poland. You can watch the embedded before 40 million years extinct plants and arthropods. The exhibition is also complemented with colorful varieties of Baltic amber.
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The Dar Pomorza, a three-masted sailing ship, was built in 1909 at the Blohm-Voss shipyard in Hamburg as a training ship for the German merchant navy. Launched on September 18, 1909, it was named "Prinzess Eitel Friedrich". In 1929, the ship was purchased through public donations by the Pomeranian Committee of the National Fleet and renamed "Dar Pomorza", commemorating the generosity of the Pomeranian community. On June 19, 1930, the "Dar Pomorza" first anchored in the roads of Gdynia and in the same year was handed over to the Maritime School in Gdynia. Over 51 years of service for the Polish Merchant Navy, it completed 102 training voyages, covering half a million nautical miles. On board, 13,384 students of the Maritime School were trained. Its final voyage took place in September 1981 under the command of Captain Tadeusz Olechnowicz, to the Finnish port of Kotka. On August 4, 1982, the "Dar Pomorza" was formally decommissioned, and at the same time, the flag was raised on its successor, the "Dar Młodzieży", designed and built in Gdańsk. On November 16, 1982, the "Dar Pomorza" was transferred to the Central Maritime Museum in Gdańsk, where since 1983 it has served as a museum.
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